3rd Grade Spotlight: Mrs. Jeanquart's Classroom

student writers

Max, Lucy and Yvette explain how Mrs. Jeanquarts class became experts on reading and writing mysteries.

Written By: Max, Lucy, and Yvette

Typed By: Mrs. Gauthier

 

Mystery Writing, Reading, and Celebration

We are in Mrs. Jeanquart's class and we have been working on mysteries in reading and writing.

We read a couple of mystery books as a class. First, we read Mystery A to Z: Absent Author. We had to figure out who was Wallace Wallace. It ended up being a girl, which was not expected. There were some really good clues in this book. For example, her handkerchief had WW on it but it was upside down so it looked like MM.  The next book we read as a class was called, Diamond Mystery. We had a detective notebook where we kept track of clues, suspects, and specific facts. Most of us did not figure out the correct suspect before it ended. It was pretty good how it ended because it was super sneaky and you had to pay really close attention to figure it out. 

We also read mysteries in our small group reading. There are normally three to five kids in our groups. Each group read a different mystery. Some groups read Boxcar Children books, Encyclopedia Brown books, or Cam Jansen books. We had a writing packet and we kept notes on the book as we read. After each chapter, we recorded our thoughts. Our group book was much easier to solve than the class book, Diamond Mystery. We found it really helpful to listen to each other's thoughts when we met in the group because the discussion helped us piece our thoughts together to find the answer. 

After we learned about mysteries in our reading, we wrote a mystery story in writing. First, we had to think of our characters. Then we got deeper into the story and added more characters. We made sure we had a victim. We also had to brainstorm character traits on our paper and put those into our mystery story. Mysteries also need suspects, those are the people who might be guilty of the crime. Sometimes the suspects have an alibi, which means that they have a really good reason they could not have done the crime. We wanted the reader to figure out who did the crime in our stories before our mystery story ended so we put clues in our story. Sometimes we used sneaky clues and sometimes we used very obvious clues. We also included red herrings. These were trick clues that make the reader think they know who did it, but they were wrong. Once we finished writing our stories, we typed them up and printed them on paper.

Today we are having a celebration with Mrs. Schneeberger's class. We are reading our mystery to the second graders. Our mystery unit was our favorite writing unit so far!


students reading

 

students reading

 

students reading

 

students reading

 

 

students reading

 

students reading

 

students reading

 

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